Languages

The language program fosters the students' progression toward advanced literary analysis and deeper cultural explorations. We shape modern global citizens by giving them the keys to high-order critical thinking skills, sustained examination of cultural topics, and applied language skills for a range of post-educational pursuits. We create a student-centered language and cultural immersion environment, which emphasizes a task-based and communicative approach to language acquisition. Students learn through communication-based activities and utilize their language skills to tackle real-life experiences. We cultivate both cultural and linguistic fluency in our classes and encourage connections with other disciplinary areas. Because language is relevant to all areas of experience, our classes forge connections with multiple academic topics and community issues. Riverdale graduates will have a strong sense of the vocabulary base of English and Romance languages, and will be comfortable with logical inference, enabling them to decipher and make sense of complex syntax in English and other languages and systems.

Chinese 6

Chinese 6

Chinese 6 is the first course in the basic Chinese language course series designed to introduce the language and cultures of the Chinese-speaking peoples. It presupposes no prior knowledge of Mandarin Chinese. This course aims to provide the student with a rudimentary knowledge of the Chinese romanization system (pinyin), pronunciation, tones, the writing system, vocabulary, and sentence structure.

Chinese 7

Chinese 7

Chinese 7 builds upon the elementary knowledge and skills introduced in Chinese 6 and continues to focus on deepening, strengthening, and refining the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. This course introduces students to uncomplicated and familiar communicative tasks and grammatical structures related to self, family, home, daily activities, interests, personal preferences, as well as personal needs such as shopping and traveling. By the end of Chinese 7, students will be exposed to approximately 400 frequently-used simplified characters and will be expected to actively use 170 of them. In addition, a variety of topics and activities related to Chinese culture will be incorporated throughout the course. Evaluation is based on class participation, homework, quizzes, oral and written tests, projects, presentations, and other formative and summative assessments.

Chinese 8

Chinese 8

Chinese 8 builds upon the preparatory knowledge and skills introduced in Chinese 7 and continues to focus on deepening, strengthening, and refining the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. This course introduces students to familiar communicative tasks related to weather, food, directions, and social life, as well as personal needs such as seeing a doctor, giving gifts, etc. Authentic and more complicated Chinese grammatical structures are also introduced in this course, such as the comparative structure, resultative complements, direction and location words, time duration expressions, "ba" construction, potential complements and directional complements. By the end of Chinese 8, students will be exposed to approximately 600 frequently-used simplified characters and will be expected to actively use 350 of them. In addition, a variety of topics and activities related to Chinese culture will continue to be incorporated throughout the course. Evaluation is based on class participation, homework, quizzes, oral and written tests, projects, presentations, and other formative and summative assessments.

French 6

French 6

Language study in French 6 becomes more structured. Students acquire more basic oral, listening, writing, and reading skills as they move through a curriculum of thematic units. At this level, the student's grade will be based on his or her class participation, short daily homework assignments, occasional larger projects, and, of course on oral and written tests. The weight of each of these factors will vary, with the formal in-class assessments usually deemed the most important.

 

French 7

French 7

This course is designed to develop and strengthen skills in the four main components of language acquisition: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Basic grammatical principles and level-appropriate vocabulary, as well as oral/aural practice using the state-of-the-art language lab, will be used to foster eventual second-language use in the classroom. Films, short stories, the Internet, and other media will be used to reinforce grammar and vocabulary work.

 

French 8

French 8

A review and enhancement of basic grammar and skill in oral communication. Readings vary but usually include material from Bienvenue, plus an extended chapter story in French, "Le Mystère des Faux Billets." Vocabulary is taken from the readings, the texts, and classroom situations. About thirty minutes’ of homework is assigned after every class. Assessments during the quarter include oral projects, one or two major tests, quizzes, and dictations.

Latin 6

Latin 6

A reading-based introduction to the Latin language and to Roman civilization. The textbook Ecce Romani and supplemental materials introduce at least the first three declensions of nouns and adjectives, several tenses of verb forms, as well as pronouns and infinitives. Students explore word roots, derivatives, and the wide influence of Latin on English vocabulary. Roman civilization is examined through a study of daily life in ancient Italy and through myths and history. Nightly homework complements and supports classwork through reading, translation, and various written or computer-based exercises. Assessment includes short quizzes, longer tests, and various other written and oral projects.

Latin 7

Latin 7

A continuation to the Latin language and to Roman civilization. Ecce Romani and supplemental materials introduce declensions, indicative verb forms, pronouns and infinitives. Word roots, word formation, and derivatives are explored. Roman civilization is examined through a study of the city of Rome and through myths and history. Nightly homework may include reading, translation, composition, and exercises in textbook, workbook, or worksheets. Students are expected to use available Internet material for practice and review. Frequent (weekly or bi-weekly) written assessments: quizzes (vocabulary and/or grammar) and half-period or full-period tests on single chapters or multi-chapter units. Class participation and homework completion also contribute to the course grade each quarter. After Latin 7, students enter into the Upper School course, Latin II.

Spanish 6

Spanish 6

Language study in Spanish 6 becomes more structured. Students acquire more basic oral, listening, writing and reading skills as they move through a curriculum of thematic units. At this level, the student's grade will be based on his or her class participation, short daily homework assignments, occasional larger projects, and, of course on oral and written tests. The weight of each of these factors will vary, with the formal in-class assessments usually deemed the most important.

 

Spanish 7

Spanish 7

This course is designed to develop and strengthen skills in the four main components of language acquisition: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Basic grammatical principles and level-appropriate vocabulary, as well as oral/aural practice using the state-of-the-art language lab, will be used to foster eventual second-language use in the classroom. Films, short stories, the Internet, and other media will be used to reinforce grammar and vocabulary work.

 

Spanish 8

Spanish 8

A review and enhancement of basic grammar and skill in oral communication. Readings vary but usually include material from Bienvenidos, plus extended readings in the Spanish reader, Alejandro. Vocabulary is taken from the readings, the texts, and classroom situations. About thirty minutes’ of homework is assigned after every class. Assessments during the quarter include oral projects, one or two major tests, quizzes, and dictations.

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Bronx, NY 10471

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